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Fluvial Geosciences Lab Research

The heterogeneous floodplain landscape of Rio Juruá, Brazil depicts a patch mosaic of geomorphic landforms created by meandering river processes. Image is created from SRTM-derived elevation model.The heterogeneous floodplain landscape of Rio Juruá, Brazil depicts a patch mosaic of geomorphic landforms created by meandering river processes. Image is created from SRTM-derived elevation model.
The spatial scale of erosional heterogeneity (patchiness) strongly influences the spatial characteristics of planform evolution (Güneralp and Rhoads, 2011, Geophys. Res. Letts. www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011GL048134.shtml)The spatial scale of erosional heterogeneity (patchiness) strongly influences the spatial characteristics of planform evolution (Güneralp and Rhoads, 2011, Geophys. Res. Letts.)

Planform change of Rio Beni, Bolivia, is a highly mobile large sand-bed river of the Amazon Basin for the period of 1987–2010. The river is characterized by variable channel widths, rapid meander migration and cutoffs, and active chute and channel bifurcates that coevolve with the main channel. 1987 Landsat image.Planform change of Rio Beni, Bolivia, is a highly mobile large sand-bed river of the Amazon Basin for the period of 1987–2010. The river is characterized by variable channel widths, rapid meander migration and cutoffs, and active chute and channel bifurcates that coevolve with the main channel. 1987 Landsat image.
Aerial image of a meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River shows the GPS-mounted ADCP data locations (blue) and the transects at which velocity data were collected (orange) in August 2010.Aerial image of a meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River shows the GPS-mounted ADCP data locations (blue) and the transects at which velocity data were collected (orange) in August 2010.

Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the meander bend on the lower Brazos River generated by fusing the GPS-mounted ADCP data collected in August 2010 with radar-derived DEM of the site.Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the meander bend on the lower Brazos River generated by fusing the GPS-mounted ADCP data collected in August 2010 with radar-derived DEM of the site.
The field campaign in August 2010 on the meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River.The field campaign in August 2010 on the meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River.

The field campaign in August 2010 on the meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River.The field campaign in August 2010 on the meander bend on the incised section of the lower Brazos River.
LiDAR-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of a reach of the lower Brazos River showing former positions of the river channel and a series of neck and chute cutoffs creating oxbow lakes.LiDAR-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of a reach of the lower Brazos River showing former positions of the river channel and a series of neck and chute cutoffs creating oxbow lakes.

Vast arterial network of Amazon River draining a large portion of the continent. The image created using SRTM elevation measurements combined with river and stream channels from HydroSHEDS. Elevation ranges from sea level (green) to 4,500 meters above sea level (white). Streambeds appear in blue. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory.Vast arterial network of Amazon River draining a large portion of the continent. The image created using SRTM elevation measurements combined with river and stream channels from HydroSHEDS. Elevation ranges from sea level (green) to 4,500 meters above sea level (white). Streambeds appear in blue. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory.
2006 LiDAR-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the tidal channels in the Chocolate Bay showing intricate meandering patterns.2006 LiDAR-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the tidal channels in the Chocolate Bay showing intricate meandering patterns.

A closer look to the intricate meandering patterns of the tidal channels flowing into the Chocolate Bay. 2011 natural color aerial photo by NAIP programA closer look to the intricate meandering patterns of the tidal channels flowing into the Chocolate Bay. 2011 natural color aerial photo by NAIP program.
Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill laps around the mouth of the Mississippi River delta in this May 24, 2010, image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The oil appears silver, while vegetation is red. Photo courtesy Allen/NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill laps around the mouth of the Mississippi River delta in this May 24, 2010, image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The oil appears silver, while vegetation is red. Photo courtesy Allen/NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.
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