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Christian Brannstrom
Christian Brannstrom
Phone:
(979) 845-3651
Email:
cbrannst@geog.tamu.edu
Office:
CSA 202B or Eller O&M 202
Address:

202 O&M Building

Department of Geography
Texas A&M University
MS 3148
College Station, Texas 77843


Degrees:

Ph.D. Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1998)

Awards:

Association of Former Students, Distinguished Achievement Award (teaching), College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University (2013)

Courses:

GEOS 405: Global Change

GEOG 309: Geography of Energy

GEOG 323: Latin America

GEOG 450: Field Geography

Additional Notes

Dr. Brannstrom has led study abroad programs to Brazil and Costa Rica.


Christian Brannstrom

Professor
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Geosciences
Director, Environmental Programs in Geosciences

Research Interests

Research

Dr. Brannstrom’s research focuses on social and political aspects of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuels in Texas and environmental governance in Brazil, where he has conducted field work since 1994.  He has supported collaborators working on perceptions of rip currents and pedagogical aspects of his study abroad experiences. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Geographic Society.

Selected Publications

Selected publications

  • Brannstrom, C. (ed.), Territories, Commodities and Knowledges: Latin American Environmental History in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (London: Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2004)
  • Brannstrom, C. and J. Vadjunec (eds.), Land Change Science, Political Ecology, and Sustainability: Synergies and Divergences (Abingdon: Earthscan from Routledge, 2013) [ISBN 978-0-415-54023-0]
  • Brannstrom, C. (2015) “Brazil” [Chapter 13] in Latin America, ed. B. Blouet and O. Blouet (New York: John Wiley, 7th edition, ISBN 978-1118729847)
  • Brannstrom, C., Houser, C., Brown, H. L., Trimble, S., Santos, A. (2015), “‘You can’t see them from sitting here’: Evaluating beach user understanding of a rip current warning signs,” Applied Geography 56: 61-70 [DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.10.011]
  • Brannstrom, C., S. Trimble, A. Santos, H. Lee Brown, C. Houser (2014), “Perception of the rip current hazard on Galveston Island and North Padre Island, Texas, USA,” Natural Hazards 72(2): 1123-38 [DOI: 10.1007/s11069-014-1061-3]
  • Lemmons, K., C. Brannstrom and D. Hurd (2014), “Exposing repeat photography: Increasing cultural understanding on a short-term study abroad,” Journal of Geography in Higher Education 38(1): 86-105 [DOI: 10.1080/03098265.2013.836745]
  • Brannstrom, C., and P. R. B. Brandão (2012), “Two hundred hectares of good business: Brazilian agriculture in a themed space,” Geographical Review 102 (4): 465-85Brannstrom, C. (2012), “John Shary, Charles Pease, and contested irrigation landscapes in early-twentieth-century South Texas,” Journal of Historical Geography 38: 234-46 [doi: 10.1016/j.jhg.2012.03.004]
  • Brannstrom, C., L. Rausch, C. Brown, Marson, R., Miccolis, A. (2012), “Compliance and market exclusion in Brazilian agriculture: Analysis and implications for ‘soft’ governance,” Land Use Policy (29): 357-66 [DOI: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2011.07.006]
  • Brannstrom, C. (2011), “A Q-method analysis of environmental governance discourses in Brazil’s northeastern soy frontier,” Professional Geographer 64(3): 531-49 [DOI: 10.1080/00330124.2011.585081]
  • Brannstrom, C., Jepson, W., Persons, N. (2011), “Social perspectives on wind-power development in west Texas,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 101(4): 839-51 [doi: 10.1080/00045608.2011.568871]
  • Brannstrom, C. (2010) “Forests for cotton: Institutions and organizations in Brazil’s mid-twentieth-century cotton boom,” Journal of Historical Geography 36(2): 169-82 [DOI: 10.1016/j.jhg.2009.10.001]
  • Jepson, W., C. Brannstrom, and A. Filippi (2010) “Access regimes and regional land change in the Brazilian Cerrado, 1972-2002,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 100 (1): 87-111 [doi: 10.1080/00045600903378960]
  • Brannstrom, C. (2009) “South America’s neoliberal agricultural frontiers: Places of environmental sacrifice or conservation opportunity?” Ambio 38(3): 141-9 [doi: 10.1579/0044-7447-38.3.141]
  • Brannstrom, C., Neuman, M. (2009) “Inventing the ‘Magic Valley’ of South Texas, 1905-1941,” Geographical Review 99(2): 123-45  [doi: 10.1111/j.1931-0846.2009.tb00423.x]
  • Brannstrom, C., et al. (2008) “Land change in the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), 1986-2002: Comparative analysis and land-use policy implications,” Land Use Policy 25: 579-95  [DOI: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2007.11.008.
  • Brannstrom, C. (2005) “Was Brazilian industrialisation fuelled by wood? Evaluating the wood hypothesis, 1900-1960,” Environment and History 11(4): 395-430
  • Brannstrom, C. (2005) “The timber trade in south-eastern Brazil, 1920-1960,” Bulletin of Latin American Research 24(3): 288-310
  • Brannstrom, C. (2005) “Environmental policy reform on north-eastern Brazil’s agricultural frontier,” Geoforum 36 (2): 257-71
  • Brannstrom, C. (2002) “Rethinking the ‘Atlantic Forest’ of Brazil: New evidence for land cover and land value in Western São Paulo, 1900-1930,” Journal of Historical Geography 28(3): 420-39

Additional Information

Graduate Students

  • Kellie Wilcox-Moore, MS Student (Chair)
  • Nicole Persons, MS Student (Chair)
  • Sasha Broadstone, MS Student (Chair)
  • Kristian Saguin, PhD Student (Chair)
  • Anna Santos, PhD Student (Chair)
  • Fiona Wilmot, PhD Student (Chair)
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