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Jonathan M. Smith
Jonathan M. Smith
Phone:
(979) 845-7128
Email:
jmsmith@tamu.edu
Office:
O&M 817
Address:

810 O&M Building

Department of Geography
Texas A&M University
MS 3147
College Station, Texas 77843-3147


Degrees:

Ph.D. Syracuse University, 1991

Courses:

GEOG 202: Global Village

GEOG 301: Geography of the US
GEOG 311: Cultural Geography
GEOG 440: History and Nature of Geography
GEOG 605: Processes in Cultural Geography

GEOG 610: Geographic Methods and Theory


Jonathan M. Smith

Professor

Research Interests

Dr. Smith is a cultural-historical geographer primarily interested in the history of geographical ideas and geographical thought. He studies the expression of such ideas in cultural landscapes, geographical behavior, geographical scholarship, and other varieties of literature. He has published articles on geographers’ use of metaphor, irony, and rhetoric, on the development of geographical concepts such as region, place, and environmental ethics, and on the geographical imagination in 17th century England and the 19th century United States. He has also published articles on landscape symbolism, the role of technology in geographical change, and the geographical conditions of contemporary identity. He has co-edited six books and is presently co-editor of the journal Ethics, Place, and Environment. He teaches a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on cultural geography, cultural landscapes, and the history and nature of geography.

 

Selected Publications

  • Smith, J. M. 2014. The Guilt of Hollow Men: Global Warming as Postmodern Apocalypse.” pp. 351-362.  In James Norwine (ed.) After Climate Change and Culture-Shift: Imagining a World. Springer, New York
  • Smith, J. M. 2011. Therapeutic Geopolitics. Geopolitics 16: 467-472.
  • Smith, J. M. 2010. Apotheosis of the Hungry God: Nihilism and the Contours of Scholarship.  Ethics, Place and Environment 13: 31-41
  • Smith, J. M. and Jim Norwine.  2010.  Remapping Geography. Academic Questions 22:  431-441.
  • Smith J. M. Needful Discriminations.  Journal of Political Geography 27, 343-348
  • Smith, J. M. 2007. The Texas Aggie Bonfire: A Conservative Reading of Regional Narratives, Traditional Practices, and a Paradoxical Place. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 97(1):182-201.
  • Smith, J. M. 1996. State Formation, Geography, and a Gentleman’s Education. The Geographical Review, 86(1): 91-100.
  • Smith, J. M. 1996. Geographical Rhetoric: Modes and Tropes of Appeal. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 86(1):1-20.
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